Traces of E. coli found in Moot water

Photo for illustration. Photo: Pexels

Traces of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was recently found in water in the Moot area.

This happened when a resident from Wonderboom South, Isabel Stoltz, noticed that her dogs had diarrhoea.

“I immediately thought it was the food. I returned to the shop I bought the food from to find out what was going on,” she said.

“They took the bag of food back for testing and also took a sample of the water.”

She said according to the shop, they had a similar occurrence where it was the water that was causing the diarrhoea.

The test results, taken in April/May this year showed that the water had traces of E. coli.

The report was conducted by a SANAS accredited laboratory from Pretoria, who confirmed the information on Thursday.

Stoltz said on Tuesday the dog’s diarrhoea had improved slightly, but was not completely gone.

“This makes me wonder if the water still has any traces of it,” she said.

Tshwane metro spokesperson, Selby Bokaba told Rekord on Friday that the Department of Water and Sanitation would investigate the matter.

“The metro needs to inspect on-site the alleged e-coli contamination and give factual findings,” he said.

Upon query, the ward councillor, Elmarie Linde was not aware of the matter.

E. coli is a type of bacteria that normally live in the intestines of people and animals.

Some of the early symptoms of E. coli, the infection may include fever, nausea, vomiting, and bloody diarrhoea.

Some of the later symptoms of E. coli infection are nosebleeds, shortness of breath, seizures and excessive bleeding.

E. coli infection is contagious and can be spread from person to person by faecal contamination.

Pets, such as dogs, can contract colibacillosis, which is a disease caused by E. coli.

Colibacillosis may cause the following symptoms in an affected dog:

– Depression

– Dehydration

– Lack of appetite

– Vomiting

– Rapid heart rate

– Weakness

– Lethargy

– Watery diarrhoea

– Cold skin (due to low body temperature)

– Bluish coloured mucous membranes due to inadequate oxygen in red blood cells

ALSO READ:

Water Wednesday: How much water does the average South African consume?

Do you have more information about the story? Please send us an email to [email protected] or phone us on 083 625 4114.

For free breaking and community news, visit Rekord’s websites:

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  AUTHOR
Kayla van Petegem

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